Analysis / Identification of a 2018 “Super-Fake” Rolex and Fake Warranty Card

Lost Thousands on a “Super-Fake” Rolex? Afraid you Might?

We offer an effective resource to strengthen your defences, now in use at over 350 sites!


“…this is epic and certainly worth the money! Well done, fabulous document! . . . I think this will be a resource which all valuers and even, IMHO, all retailers should have – well the ones that buy in over the counter for sure! …what a superb reference this is, really very impressed!”

 – a leading UK valuer.

“It’s worth a bucket-load more . . .

Only a fool wouldn’t want a copy and know it’s a great price for what it will save.”

 – a prominent UK pawnbroker.


BUY IT NOW :  CLICK HERE for the SIMPLE FORM!   Price? See below the many testimonials!

This offer is available ONLY to jewellers, pawnbrokers, valuers and others of bona fides (at our absolute discretion).

Recognised by trade bodies, insurers and police as leading specialists in Rolex watches, Miltons have enjoyed widely-celebrated successes in 2018 identifying high level “Super-Fake” Rolex watches. Now we are willing to share some of our secrets with others in the trade.

Almost exclusively copying models from the highly desirable stainless steel “Professional” range of Rolexes, these Super-Fakes are specifically designed to con you. Manufactured to a very high standard, containing cloned movements badged like the originals, these uniquely numbered watches usually come with a mix of genuine and very well faked accessories including high level imitation warranty cards to create an impressive, complete package.

Too many times we have had to advise where other jewellers and pawnbrokers have fallen victim to the crooks, losing them thousands of pounds. What value does a single piece of information have, that might prevent your business losing thousands, or perhaps selling a fake to the public?

Using an example of a Super-Fake Submariner that a would-be seller left behind (he departed in a hurry!), we have created an extensive document of guidance and macro photographs (most shown side-by-side with the real thing) that should prove immensely useful in identifying the prevalent, high-end fake Rolex sports watches, parts and accessories. Originally intended for our own exclusive benefit, we were convinced to offer this precious resource more widely when more and more people requested help in some form. The document includes specific sections on the main case, bracelet, movement, current / fake warranty card, swing-tag and more.

“The document is brilliant…it is excellent and the whole while I read it not only did I learn more myself, but importantly I kept thinking how useful to staff this is going to be…There is a lot of detail in the document and I can see it has taken significant hard work to produce.”

– jeweller and pawnbroker with seven branches.

“The document is excellent, it is straight forward to read and is delivered in a very understandable manner.”

– owner, pawnbroking and financial services group.

Sample pages from the Movement section, comparing Super-Fake with genuine.

The information contained in this document represents significant commercial value and it is not shared lightly. The cost reflects that value, the years of experience that lie behind it, the cost of creating the digital document, the commercial advantage shared — and the obvious saving that its use might generate.

Avoid just ONE Super-Fake Rolex as a result of buying this resource, and it will have paid for itself many times over.

“Amazing reference document Haywood. Thanks for letting us have a copy – it’s a relief to have you lurking in the background!”

– Rolex Main Agent !
“Haywood Milton has created a mammoth resource for valuers and retailers alike – it really is a superb document and as some of you already know, Haywood is one of the most well-informed and knowledgeable experts on all things Rolex.
I have seen this document grow over the last couple of weeks and I now own the final version – it really is a must if you have any dealings with valuing, buying in, and even selling Rolex – the 40 page document, full of comparison photo’s and key points to look for from the outer casing and the movement , to the guarantee and swing tag variances – is a major help to us. The cost of this document is extremely reasonable given the time taken and knowledge required to put such a comprehensive comparison document together – and if it saves even one of us getting caught out when valuing such a superfake then it is money very well spent!”
– UK jewellery valuers’ forum
“…your analysis is worth every penny and more.  I am currently not aware of anything in print which covers the fake vs genuine in such detail, or any detail for that matter.  The information it contains could and I am sure will save someone from spending good money on a watch they believe is genuine, but is in fact a fake.”
– independent valuer
I am ready to pay you for that information that you forwarded on Saturday. Which, by the way is superb.”
– independent jeweller and valuer
“We have had a look at the document and [ the head of the watch department ] reckons we would get real benefit from being able to refer to it…….. just let us know what price you would like us to pay?”
– major independent auction house
“I just wanted to say thank you for sending through a copy of your “Super-fake” Rolex document. I have read through it this morning and it is an absolutely great tool to have available to us. We will definitely be using it as a point of reference.”
– the head of the watch department at the above auction house.

“Just completed my study of your masterpiece. Truly excellent work Mr Milton. I learned A LOT from it and I’m sure my staff will find it most helpful too, even though all purchases go through myself it will give them an understanding of the extent the villains will go to con us! 

As you said I did find the warranty card section most interesting…

All in all the best £200 I’ve spent for a long long time!”
– pawnbroking franchisee, two shops

Firstly thank you for sending the link over so quickly, it is much appreciated.  I’d also like to thank you for taking the time to produce such a fantastically detailed and useful analysis.  I am sure this is going to be of incredible benefit to many and your photographs are fantastic!

From my own personal perspective, I found it incredibly reassuring that all of the external ‘finishing’ aspects that you have covered, are things that I currently look for.  Which perversely has me more concerned about missing a fake, because I should really know better.

I also have to give a minor amount of credit to the fakers, they really are pulling out all the stops and doing their best to copy Rolex.  But as you have so clearly highlighted, the level of finish on the fake, just isn’t up to the Rolex standard.  But that is of little help, if you don’t know what the real thing should look like.  So having such detailed images of fake vs genuine is going to be incredibly helpful to many.

I was also really impressed with your advice in relation to checking bracelet reference numbers and removing links to check for authenticity.  Very simple and straight forward things, but as you will well know, far too many people (especially valuers), don’t do the simple things.

For me the standout aspect to the analysis which taught me so much, was the section on the warranty card.  I stopped working for an authorised Rolex stockiest in 2011 so my exposure to the current warranty cards has been limited.  So to have such a detailed breakdown of all the current security features, again with so many clearly detailed photographs is worth the fee on its own.  

I also appreciate the addition of the bracelet, movement, head weight section.  I myself have been putting together a list of clean head weights, but it’s been slow going, so this is a very useful section.

Your advice on opening a case back and what to consider is incredibly prudent.  As you will well know there is an argument by many in the valuing world that every watch, not just a Rolex should be opened and the movement checked when valuing.  For me personally, opening a case up is number 10 of my 1-10 check list.  It is something I will do, but only if I have need too and with the client’s written consent.  And with high end watches, I am lucky enough to have access to several authorised workshops, so in those instances, I get them to do it.  Because as you clearly state, opening a case back, opens up a whole can of the proverbial worms and unless you really know what you’re looking at once you are in there, what is the point?

Of course there are exceptions to this.  If the watch is a vintage or a particularly rare or desirable watch, then yes absolutely you need to make sure the movement is correct.  And if you’re buying pre-owned then I think every watch movement should be checked.  To not do so, would be akin to buying a car and not checking to see if it started! 

But for new or for valuers who are inexperienced with watches, this section clearly outlines many of the potential pitfalls of opening a case back, which they need to know.  Some parts of the ‘must open’ argument make opening a case back sound as easy as opening your front door.  So to have something that will give many pause for thought and ask, is this completely necessary, is incredibly useful.

Overall I am really impressed with the report and the level of detail it contains, it is a must for any valuer of company that deals in pre-owned Rolexes. 

Please let me know how much I owe and I will make payment promptly.  Also please put me down as a guaranteed purchaser of any revised or future reports such as this.

Independent valuer
[The owner] had a brief look at the document Saturday whilst he was here, and was very impressed with the amount of information and the level of detail.
I have had a good read through this morning and feel it will be a great help identifying fakes.
I thought I had a reasonable knowledge of Rolex Watches and spotting fakes, but have learnt an enormous amount.
I haven’t rolled it out to the branches yet but it will be an invaluable tool.
Happy to endorse it 100%
– traditional pawnbroker, seven stores
“Your SuperFakes guide is really good and a valuable tool in identifying fake, it’s needed nowadays with so many fakes circulating.”
– Senior Specialist, watch dept. of a leading regional auction house

Having recently obtained a copy of Milton’s analysis, I can say that it is a fantastic addition . . . what Milton has covered is more the external, visual and cosmetic indicators of these newer fakes.  Such as comparisons between the engraving, text font styles and level of finish on the watch head, bracelet and clasp.

The report also covers the new fake warranty cards, which even have fairly decent copies of the security features seen on the genuine cards, such as the UV-activated ‘Rolex’ pattern.  Which I have to say are pretty good and could easily be missed if you didn’t know what to look for.  The report also covers other accessories, such as boxes, booklets and swing tags, which often accompany these newer fakes.

So for those instances where opening the case back isn’t possible for whatever reason, or if you’re doing a post loss and all you have is the box and warranty card.  Then this report will be an exceptionally useful addition to your reference library.”

– Independent valuer (MIRV) to valuers’ discussion group


COST :

For a jewellery / pawnbroking business with no more than ONE shop : £150.

For each additional shop the business has : an additional £50…..

…..but capped at £600 (so that this is the most payable by a single business of any size).

Insurers, valuers, auction houses and others : by individual negotiation, commensurate to scale of business.

All costs shown exclude VAT which will be applied at 20%. Businesses with multiple shops may not simply “buy a copy for just one shop.” This simple pricing structure is designed to reflect the commercial advantage and value derived commensurately by smaller and bigger businesses. 


MORE Testimonials!

“The level of details in your analysis is fantastic. As you mentioned, the fakers tend to focus the majority of their attention on the watch head; although they have flaws they are becoming fewer and fewer. The glaring errors are often found elsewhere (bracelet, accessories etc).

Your analysis of the cards was great, not something I have looked in to in such depth. The ones that  have crossed my path thus far have been of a quality that is far behind the watch and they would jump out at you as being wrong from the off. That being said, your example fake card is the first I have seen with . . . [ censored ]. I also enjoyed learning of the . . . [ censored ].

I can appreciate you have put many hours in to this document, and for anyone with a genuine interest in the subject would find of great use and value. Personally I learned of knew details, reinforced some observed beliefs, as well as reminding myself of small details I had forgotten.

Long term I would certainly find more publications beneficial, the more knowledge you have at your disposal the better.”

– Manager of the Watch Dept. at a large, independent pawnbroking chain.

About the author:

Haywood Milton, M.A.(Hons), R.J.Dip. is the Managing Director of three jewellery companies employing some 80 staff in the North West of England and a specialist in Rolex watches from the 1950s to the present day. He has lectured the UK’s National Association of Goldsmiths and the National Pawnbrokers Association on the subject, written a number of published technical articles on Rolex identification, regularly advises insurers and law enforcement bodies in matters relating to Rolex watches, assists various NAJ / IRV Registered Valuers with Rolex appraisals and writes technical reports on pieces where third parties need specialist opinion. He estimates that some 15,000 Rolex watches have come under his eye-glass so far. In March 2017 he was invited as industry specialist to address an assembly of UK police force representatives on the subject of high value watches and associated crime. This was so well received that he was invited back to address representatives from the UK’s police forces again in February 2018, at the Metropolitan Police / Flying Squad offices in London. He has now been invited to produce a short course on identifying fake watches for the National Pawnbrokers Association and in October 2018 spoke yet again on the subject of High Value Watch Crime alongside representatives from the Met. Police, Safergems and the Art Loss Register. Haywood has spent the last 15 years building the special Miltons selection of historically interesting and extremely rare Rolexes, including nine 5513 and two 5517 military issue Submariners, Comex models 5513, 5514, 1665, 16800 (2) and 16600, three “Double Red” Sea-Dweller 1665s, two “Great White” Sea-Dweller 1665s, two Red Submariner 1680s and two White, two 1016 Explorers, three 5500 Explorers and a 14270 “Blackout” Explorer, three Explorer II 1655s, a gilt dial 5513, three Milgauss 1019s, a 5508 Submariner, two 6536/1 Submariners, a Daytona 6263, a Rolex GMT-Master 6542, three Rolex GMT-Master 1675s, a Rolex GMT-Master 116710 SeaKing, a pointed crown-guard / gilt dial 5513 Submariner with “Double Swiss” marking / underline dial, two meters-first Submariner 5513s and many more. These pieces provide Miltons with an invaluable resource whenever further, similar old Rolex cross our path.

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  1. This document is intended to provide observations, opinion and inspiration only. No warranty in any form is provided by its author(s) as to the accuracy of the information contained or suggested herein nor is any liability in any form accepted by him/them, to include specifically (but not exclusively) where a person determines their actions / inaction using information contained herein.
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  1. The author is not affiliated in any way with Rolex SA Geneva or any of its associated companies.
  2. Supply will be made only to businesses, relevant professionals and others of bona fides, at the absolute discretion of the provider.
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  4. References to the “document” are to the electronic file whose first page is entitled “Analysis / Identification of 2018 “Super-Fake” and Accessories Compared with a Genuine Rolex Submariner 116610LN” and attributed to Haywood Milton, regardless of whether in such electronic form, printed out in hard copy or in any other form.
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